Boston Book Festival
Oct
19
4:30 PM16:30

Boston Book Festival

Black History Detectives: Discovering 19th Century Stories Through Documents and Artifacts

Panel with Tera W. Hunter, Edwards Professor of American History and Professor of African-American Studies at Princeton University and author of Bound in Wedlock: Slave and Free Black Marriage in the Nineteenth Century (Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2017) and Rayshauna Gray, researcher with Tufts University's history department and Center for the Study of Race & Democracy, Policy Administrative coordinator of Harvard’s Opportunity Insights’ policy team, and author of Roseland (Forthcoming, Belt Publishing).

Panel Description

In this session, we’ll hear from two historians who have used innovative and painstaking research methods to shape their chronicles of African American history. Tera W. Hunter is the 2018 winner of the Museum of African American History (MAAH) Stone Book Award for Bound in Wedlock: Slave and Free Black Marriage in the 19th Century, and Stephanie E. Jones-Rogers is the author of They Were Her Property: White Women as Slave Owners in the American South, called “a taut and cogent corrective” by Parul Sehgal in the New York Times. Their conversation, moderated by historian Rayshauna Gray, will focus on the authors’ use of documents and artifacts—letters, newspaper advertisements, court records, birth certificates, etc.—as evidence and inspiration for building individual stories that are emblematic of African American history. They will speak to the discovery of particular primary sources that informed their work, and the way that these historical records and archival materials underpinned their research, highlighting themes of discovery, agency, tenacity, family, resilience, marriage, kinship, and the intertwining of slavery and freedom. Sponsored by the Plymouth Rock Foundation and the Jim and Cathy Stone Foundation to honor the MAAH Stone Book Award, this session will resonate with the tactile museum experience, combining the power of artifact and story to make history come alive.

A book signing will immediately follow the panel.

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Social Science Matrix "Authors Meet Critics" Book Series: They Were Her Property
Oct
28
4:00 PM16:00

Social Science Matrix "Authors Meet Critics" Book Series: They Were Her Property

Description from the UC-Berkeley Social Science Matrix: “Please join us on October 28, 2019 from 4-5:30 pm for an engaging discussion about They Were Her Property: White Women as Slave Owners in the American South, by Stephanie E. Jones-Rogers, Associate Professor of History at UC Berkeley. In discussing her book, Jones-Rogers will engage with two eminent colleagues: Bryan Wagner, Associate Professor in the Department of English, UC Berkeley; and Leslie Salzinger, Associate Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies, UC Berkeley.”

RSVP Here: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScEBVIMQQWGAPk0QvVteA6W00Ari8lOCctaKo7KO9Fuyfl1Ag/viewform

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Lapidus Center Conference: “Enduring Slavery: Resistance, Public Memory, and Transatlantic Archives.”
Oct
12
9:00 AM09:00

Lapidus Center Conference: “Enduring Slavery: Resistance, Public Memory, and Transatlantic Archives.”

  • Lapidus Center for the Historical Analysis of Transatlantic Slavery (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Please join us for the 2019 Lapidus Center Conference entitled “Enduring Slavery: Resistance, Public Memory, and Transatlantic Archives,” which will be held on October 10-12, 2019, at the Schomburg Center. This conference will bring together scholars, visual artists, and writers to discuss the history of transatlantic slavery and its afterlives. The conference will begin at 6 pm on Thursday, October 10th, with the awarding of the 2019 Harriet Tubman Prize as well as an opening plenary session entitled 1619 in U.S. Memory. A reception will follow.

Two full days of sessions on topics such as gender, resistance, speculation and the archives of slavery, digital humanities, the Civil War, abolition, slavery memorialization, and much more will follow. We’re very excited that this year’s conference will feature presentations by many eminent and talented scholars, including Ed Baptist (The Half Has Never Been Told), Herman Bennett (African Kings and Black Slaves), Marisa Fuentes (Dispossessed Lives), Stephanie Jones-Rogers (They Were Her Property), the poet Marilyn Nelson (The Homeplace and The Fields of Praise), and the architect Julian Bonder (co-designed the Memorial to the Abolition of Slavery in Nantes, France).

You may register for the conference (FREE) here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/2019-lapidus-center-conference-tickets-68525173639

The schedule is available for download here: 2019 Lapidus Center Conference Schedule_9.16

Recommended Harlem Restaurants: Recommended Harlem Restaurants

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March on Washington Film Festival
Sep
24
7:00 PM19:00

March on Washington Film Festival

  • Jack Morton Auditorium, George Washington University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

She Lied: Carolyn Bryant and the Murder of Emmett Till

“When Carolyn Bryant Dunham admitted to historian Timothy Tyson that she fabricated the story that incited her husband and brother-in-law to kidnap and kill 14-year old Emmet Till in Mississippi in 1955, few were surprised.  Although the two men were acquitted by an all-white jury, Till’s death served as a major catalyst for the Civil Rights Movement and his story resonates to the present day. 

 Questions remain:   What are the historical roots of white supremacist thinking in the false accusations of black men by white women?   How has it been developed over the past centuries to the “Beckys” of the present? What could/should we have to say about Carolyn Bryant today?    

We address these questions through scholarly presentations covering three chronological perspectives.“

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Bay Area Book Festival
May
5
1:30 PM13:30

Bay Area Book Festival

The Business of Brutality: Slavery and the Foundations of Capitalism 

Look around. How much of our infrastructure—from roads and bridges to factories and food supplies—was built on the backs of American slaves? Three writer-researchers examine how the brutal history of slavery laid the foundation of American capitalism and shaped today’s racial and economic inequality. In “They Were Her Property,” Stephanie Jones-Rogers reveals the active role that white women played in the American slave economy. In “Accounting for Slavery,” Caitlin Rosenthal examines how elite planters turned their power over enslaved people into a productivity advantage. In “Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom,” David Blight investigates the legacy of the escaped slave and abolitionist, who wrote, “The white man’s happiness cannot be purchased by the black man’s misery.”

Tickets required for entry.

A book signing follows the panel. 

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Her Dream Deferred: Black Women and the #MeToo Movement
Mar
26
7:30 PM19:30

Her Dream Deferred: Black Women and the #MeToo Movement

Black women have played prominent roles in responding to sexual harassment, yet their experiences are regularly relegated to the sidelines, delegitimized, and dismissed. Panelists will examine how race influences which sexual abusers do and don’t face consequences for their misdeeds. They will compare the outrage about Harvey Weinstein, whose victims were primarily white, with the relative indifference toward R. Kelly, whose victims are primarily black.

Panelists are Kenyette Tisha BarnesStephanie Jones-RogersRashida JonesDee BarnesJamilah Lemieux. Moderated by Kimberlé Crenshaw.

ATTENDING THIS PROGRAM?

Ticketing: Free tickets are required and available at the Box Office one hour before the program. One ticket per person; first come, first served.  
Member Benefit: Members receive priority ticketing until 15 minutes before the program. Learn more about membership.
Parking: Parking is available under the museum. Rates are $7 for the first three hours with museum validation, and $3 for each additional 20 minutes, with a $20 daily maximum. There is a $7 flat rate after 6 p.m. on weekdays, and all day on weekends. Cash only. 
Restaurant: Enjoy a meal or drink before or after the program at our restaurant Audrey. Members and UCLA students receive 10% off. A late-night happy hour offers 10% off at the bar Tuesday–Saturday, 9–11 p.m.

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